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Restraining Orders

WA Government to introduce new family violence restraining order

ABC News - WA Government to introduce new family violence restraining orderThe ABC News Website has reported that a new type of restraining order is being introduced by the Western Australian Government to better protect family violence victims .

The Family Violence Restraining Order

According to Attorney-General Michael Mischin, the Family Violence Restraining Order (FVRO) was designed to reduce the onus on the victim to provide evidence of intimidating or controlling behaviour, and Courts will be required to consider information from police and other agencies including the Department for Child Protection in assessing a person’s risk. The court would then apply conditions specifically tailored for family violence, such as mandatory counselling.

The laws will be introduced later this year.

You can read the full detailed article here: New family violence restraining order set to be introduced by WA Government

Government to review domestic violence laws

Govt. reviews domestic violence lawsThe Western Australian Government is examining key recommendations from a Law Reform Commission report which includes separating family and domestic violence orders from the existing Restraining Orders Act. The report recommends treating it as a criminal offence under the Criminal Code and creating clearer definitions of what constitutes domestic violence. An article, appearing on the West Australian website on June 25th, reports that as well as considering this recommendation, it also wants Cyber-stalking to be included in the legal definition of domestic violence.

Violence Restraining Orders – domestic violence orders

Whether you need to apply for the restraining order and are seeking to be protected, have orders made against you, or are charged with a breach, Kavanagh Family Lawyers can help.

Next Steps

Call Kavanagh Lawyers on (08) 9218 8422.

VROs: Court of Appeal sets aside narrow definition of “Intimidation”

VRO Decision

In a unanimous decision* on 18 June 2014 the Western Australian Supreme Court of Appeal set aside the District Court decision in Walsh v Baron.**

In the District Court decision Staude DCJ held that the use of legally available procedures such as:

  • Making multiple interlocutory applications in VRO proceedings
  • Complaining about the Applicant (the person protected by the VRO) to a professional complaints body
  • Commencing minor claims proceedings against the Applicant; and
  • Making a perjury complaint to police about the Applicant

was not capable of constituting “An Act of abuse” [intimidation] under section 11 of the Restraining Orders Act 1997 (WA). The Court of Appeal rejected the Staude DCJ’s conclusion and stated as follows:

To threaten and/or take detrimental action against a person to achieve a collateral outcome is improper (at least) and is to behave in a manner that is intimidating, even if the action involves a person availing himself of legally available procedures.

… recourse to legally available procedures without more will not ordinarily constitute an act of abuse under s 11A of the ROA. However, the intent or purpose with which legally available procedures are threatened or used can result in the commission of a tort (malicious prosecution, abuse of process)or a criminal offence… Further, the commencement or maintenance of legal proceedings for improper collateral purpose is a tort… A knowingly frivolous and vexatious claim is also an abuse of process. ***

The Court of Appeal decision, in the writer’s view broadens (or perhaps restores) the definition of acts that could constitute intimidation under the Restraining Orders Act. The decision further puts the conduct of a respondent ( the person bound by a VRO/MRO) into the spotlight if that person for example takes out a tit-for-tat VRO/MRO; tries to sue the Applicant or complains the Applicant’s employer/professional body for ulterior purposes. In future, the Magistrates Court is likely to focus more on the intention behind the fact of bringing a legal action against an Applicant.

*Baron v Walsh [2014] WASCA 124
** Walsh v Baron[2012] WADC 165
*** McLure P at pars 65 and 65.

The Restraining Orders Act 1997 (WA) annotations

The Restraining Orders Act 1997 (WA) annotationsKavanagh Lawyers’ principal, Marty Kavanagh, has just had his 20 annotations on The Restraining Orders Act 1997 (WA) published as part of a significant update to Dickey’s Family Law with Legislation. This new authored content provides concise annotations, and are structured to help practitioners reach the information they need as quickly as possible. Read more about the update here.

Marty Kavanagh and the lawyers at Kavanagh Family Lawyers have vast experience in dealing with restraining orders. We can provide advice and court representation at any stage in the process of obtaining or defending violence restraining orders and can assist in negotiating agreements in an attempt to reduce the stress that litigation can cause.

Next Steps

  • Call Kavanagh Lawyers on (08) 9218 8422.

Restraining Orders

restraining ordersThere are 3 types of restraining orders that can be granted in Western Australia. The most well known of these is the Violence Restraining Order or VRO. This is designed to stop any future threats, property damage, violence, intimidation and emotional abuse. Violence retraining orders can be served against people in a family or domestic relationship, and against people not in a family or domestic relationship.

A misconduct restraining order (MRO) is the second type of restraining order. It an order of the court designed to stop someone behaving in a way that can be offensive or intimidating towards another. It can also prevent someone from causing damage to a person’s property or acting in a way that may lead to breeching of the peace.

The third type of restraining order is a Police Order. Police can make an on the spot restraining order in situations of family and domestic violence. A police order may be made for up to 72 hours.

Kavanagh Family Lawyers can help with all types of restraining orders

Whether you need to apply for the restraining order and are seeking to be protected, have orders made against you, or are charged with a breach, Kavanagh Family Lawyers can help.

Next Steps

Call Kavanagh Lawyers on (08) 9218 8422.

Misconduct restraining orders

Misconduct restraining orderWhat is a misconduct restraining order?

A misconduct restraining order (MRO) is an order of the court designed to stop someone behaving in a way that can be offensive or intimidating towards another. It can also prevent someone from causing damage to a person’s property or acting in a way that may lead to breeching of the peace.

A misconduct restraining order is only applicable to someone you are not in a family or domestic relationship with. If you are in a family or domestic relationship with the person you want a restraining order for, then you’ll require a violence restraining order.

Depending on the circumstances of each case, a misconduct restraining order may include conditions to stop a person doing whatever the court thinks is necessary.

Kavanagh Family Lawyers can help with misconduct restraining orders

Whether you need to apply for the misconduct restraining order and are seeking to be protected, have orders made against you, or are charged with breaching a MRO, Kavanagh Family Lawyers can help.

Next Steps

  • Call Kavanagh Lawyers on (08) 9218 8422.

VROs – Violence Restraining Orders for Children

New amendment to Restraining Orders Act 1997 WA clarifies position re Violence Restraining Orders for children (VROs)

Amendments to the Restraining Orders Act 1997 (“the Act”) received Royal Assent on 4 October 2013 have clarified the legal position regarding Violence Restraining orders for children. By amending section 25 of the Act the WA Parliament has made it clear that if a child (or a person seeking to protect a child) wishes to apply for a VRO, the application may be brought in the Childrens Court of Western Australia or the Magistrates Court. The May 2012 amendments to the Act created a situation whereby some adults seeking to protect a child and themselves were obliged to make separate applications in the Childrens court and the Magistrate Court.

The position regarding a child who is the alleged aggressor remain unchanged. If it is sought to take out a Violence Restraining Order against a child – the application can only be made in the Children’s Court of Western Australia.

Kavanagh Family Lawyers can help with violence restraining orders for children

At Kavanagh Family Lawyers, we can provide advice and court representation at any stage in the process of obtaining or defending violence restraining orders and can assist in negotiating agreements in an attempt to reduce the stress that litigation can cause.

The solicitors at Kavanagh Lawyers also have a wealth of experience in other Children’s matters, such as Child Support and Custody

Which Court has jurisdiction to Grant A VRO for a child?

TROUBLE AT MILL: JURISDICTIONAL UNCERTAINTY RE: VIOLENCE RESTRAINING ORDERS (VROs) PROTECTING CHILDREN. 

The 2011 Amendment to the Act

Which court (Magistrates Court or Children’s Court) has jurisdiction to make a Violence Restraining Order (VRO) protecting a child has become a very vexed issue in WA because of the Restraining Orders Amendment Act 2011 (WA), (“the Amendment”).

Prior to the Amendment, the Children’s Court of WA only heard VRO applications if the Respondent, (the alleged perpetrator), was a child. Thus, a child under 18 could only be restrained by order of the Children’s Court. Applications protecting children were made in the Magistrates Court. In the Amendment the legislature sought to permit a child or a specified person acting on the child’s behalf to make an application for a VRO to protect a child in the Magistrates Court or the Children’s Court. Read More